Miocene Stratigraphy

Download Miocene Stratigraphy full ebooks in PDF, ePub and Kindle version. Read online free Miocene Stratigraphy release on: 1997-06-18, by A. Montanari,R. Coccioni,G.S. Odin in category: Science book.


Miocene Stratigraphy Book

Integrated stratigraphy is essential for ⧫ detailed paleoecologic studies of critical intervals in Earth history ⧫ the calibration of the time scale for global use...

Overview

Miocene Stratigraphy - A. Montanari,R. Coccioni,G.S. Odin
pdf | 263 KB | English | Isbn: 9780080536576 | Author: A. Montanari,R. Coccioni,G.S. Odin | Release Date: 1997-06-18
Description
Integrated stratigraphy is essential for ⧫ detailed paleoecologic studies of critical intervals in Earth history ⧫ the calibration of the time scale for global use ⧫ the establishment of Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs) for the definition of chronostratigraphic boundaries. This book constitutes an excellent and probably unique example of how interdisciplinary stratigraphic and geochronologic studies are approached with modern methodologies and techniques. It contains numerous unpublished, accurate radioisotopic dates of volcano-sedimentary layers interbedded in fossiliferous marine and continental Miocene sequences representing Mediterranean and Pacific environments. New, extremely detailed paleontologic data which constitute the basis for an accurate definition of the Miocene biostratigraphy, and the study of the ecologic evolution of Miocene marine environments are also included. The chapters are complimented by black-and-white photographs, graphic figures, and tables. Stratigraphers, paleontologists and sedimentologists plus geologists working in oil companies will certainly find this work of interest.
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#1 Miocene Stratigraphy

Miocene Stratigraphy Book A. Montanari,R. Coccioni,G.S. Odin
  • Author : A. Montanari,R. Coccioni,G.S. Odin
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release Date : 1997-06-18
  • Total Pages : 691
  • Genre : Science
  • Review : (297)

Download #1 Miocene Stratigraphy eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

Integrated stratigraphy is essential for ⧫ detailed paleoecologic studies of critical intervals in Earth history ⧫ the calibration of the time scale for global use ⧫ the establishment of Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs) for the definition of chronostratigraphic boundaries. This book constitutes an excellent and probably unique example of how interdisciplinary stratigraphic and geochronologic studies are approached with modern methodologies and techniques. It contains numerous unpublished, accurate radioisotopic dates of volcano-sedimentary layers interbedded in fossiliferous marine and continental Miocene sequences representing Mediterranean and Pacific environments. New, extremely detailed paleontologic data which constitute the basis for an accurate definition of the Miocene biostratigraphy, and the study of the ecologic evolution of Miocene marine environments are also included. The chapters are complimented by black-and-white photographs, graphic figures, and tables. Stratigraphers, paleontologists and sedimentologists plus geologists working in oil companies will certainly find this work of interest.

#2 Standing on Holy Ground in the Middle Ages

Standing on Holy Ground in the Middle Ages Book Lucy Donkin
  • Author : Lucy Donkin
  • Publisher : Cornell University Press
  • Release Date : 2022-02-15
  • Total Pages : 504
  • Genre : History
  • Review : (133)

Download #2 Standing on Holy Ground in the Middle Ages eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

Standing on Holy Ground in the Middle Ages illuminates how the floor surface shaped the ways in which people in medieval western Europe and beyond experienced sacred spaces. The ground beneath our feet plays a crucial, yet often overlooked, role in our relationship with the environments we inhabit and the spaces with which we interact. By focusing on this surface as a point of encounter, Lucy Donkin positions it within a series of vertically stacked layers—the earth itself, permanent and temporary floor coverings, and the bodies of the living above ground and the dead beneath—providing new perspectives on how sacred space was defined and decorated, including the veneration of holy footprints, consecration ceremonies, and the demarcation of certain places for particular activities. Using a wide array of visual and textual sources, Standing on Holy Ground in the Middle Ages also details ways in which interaction with this surface shaped people's identities, whether as individuals, office holders, or members of religious communities. Gestures such as trampling and prostration, the repeated employment of specific locations, and burial beneath particular people or actions used the surface to express likeness and difference. From pilgrimage sites in the Holy Land to cathedrals, abbeys, and local parish churches across the Latin West, Donkin frames the ground as a shared surface, both a feature of diverse, distant places and subject to a variety of uses over time—while also offering a model for understanding spatial relationships in other periods, regions, and contexts.

#3 The Cistercian Evolution

The Cistercian Evolution Book Constance Hoffman Berman
  • Author : Constance Hoffman Berman
  • Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Release Date : 2010-03-23
  • Total Pages : 408
  • Genre : History
  • Review : (181)

Download #3 The Cistercian Evolution eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

According to the received history, the Cistercian order was founded in Cîteaux, France, in 1098 by a group of Benedictine monks who wished for a stricter community. They sought a monastic life that called for extreme asceticism, rejection of feudal revenues, and manual labor for monks. Their third leader, Stephen Harding, issued a constitution, the Carta Caritatis, that called for the uniformity of custom in all Cistercian monasteries and the establishment of an annual general chapter meeting at Cîteaux. The Cistercian order grew phenomenally in the mid-twelfth century, reaching beyond France to Portugal in the west, Sweden in the north, and the eastern Mediterranean, ostensibly through a process of apostolic gestation, whereby members of a motherhouse would go forth to establish a new house. The abbey at Clairvaux, founded by Bernard in 1115, was alone responsible for founding 68 of the 338 Cistercian abbeys in existence by 1153. But this well-established view of a centrally organized order whose founders envisioned the shape and form of a religious order at its prime is not borne out in the historical record. Through an investigation of early Cistercian documents, Constance Hoffman Berman proves that no reliable reference to Stephen's Carta Caritatis appears before the mid-twelfth century, and that the document is more likely to date from 1165 than from 1119. The implications of this fact are profound. Instead of being a charter by which more than 300 Cistercian houses were set up by a central authority, the document becomes a means of bringing under centralized administrative control a large number of loosely affiliated and already existing monastic houses of monks as well as nuns who shared Cistercian customs. The likely reason for this administrative structuring was to check the influence of the overdominant house of Clairvaux, which threatened the authority of Cîteaux through Bernard's highly successful creation of new monastic communities. For centuries the growth of the Cistercian order has been presented as a spontaneous spirituality that swept western Europe through the power of the first house at Cîteaux. Berman suggests instead that the creation of the religious order was a collaborative activity, less driven by centralized institutions; its formation was intended to solve practical problems about monastic administration. With the publication of The Cistercian Evolution, for the first time the mechanisms are revealed by which the monks of Cîteaux reshaped fact to build and administer one of the most powerful and influential religious orders of the Middle Ages.

#4 Robespierre

Robespierre Book John Hardman
  • Author : John Hardman
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release Date : 2018-10-08
  • Total Pages : 248
  • Genre : History
  • Review : (131)

Download #4 Robespierre eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

Robespierre was one of the most powerful and the most feared leaders of the French Revolution. John Hardman describes the career of this ruthless political manipulator, and in the process explores the dynamics of the French revolutionary movement and the ferocious and self-destructive rivalries of its leadership.This original book gets behind the polished but chilly surface of the public persona to reveal how Robespierre came by his extraordinary power and how he used it.

#5 City Walls in Late Antiquity

City Walls in Late Antiquity Book Emanuele Intagliata,Simon J. Barker,Christopher Courault
  • Author : Emanuele Intagliata,Simon J. Barker,Christopher Courault
  • Publisher : Oxbow Books
  • Release Date : 2020-06-30
  • Total Pages : 200
  • Genre : History
  • Review : (345)

Download #5 City Walls in Late Antiquity eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

The construction of urban defences was one of the hallmarks of the late Roman and late-antique periods (300–600 AD) throughout the western and eastern empire. City walls were the most significant construction projects of their time and they redefined the urban landscape. Their appearance and monumental scale, as well as the cost of labour and material, are easily comparable to projects from the High Empire; however, urban circuits provided late-antique towns with a new means of self-representation. While their final appearance and construction techniques varied greatly, the cost involved and the dramatic impact that such projects had on the urban topography of late-antique cities mark city walls as one of the most important urban initiatives of the period. To-date, research on city walls in the two halves of the empire has highlighted chronological and regional variations, enabling scholars to rethink how and why urban circuits were built and functioned in Late Antiquity. Although these developments have made a significant contribution to the understanding of late-antique city walls, studies are often concerned with one single monument/small group of monuments or a particular region, and the issues raised do not usually lead to a broader perspective, creating an artificial divide between east and west. It is this broader understanding that this book seeks to provide. The volume and its contributions arise from a conference held at the British School at Rome and the Swedish Institute of Classical Studies in Rome on June 20-21, 2018. It includes articles from world-leading experts in late-antique history and archaeology and is based around important themes that emerged at the conference, such as construction, spolia-use, late-antique architecture, culture and urbanism, empire-wide changes in Late Antiquity, and the perception of this practice by local inhabitants.

#6 Conscripts and Deserters

Conscripts and Deserters Book Alan Forrest
  • Author : Alan Forrest
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release Date : 1989-11-23
  • Total Pages : 304
  • Genre : History
  • Review : (360)

Download #6 Conscripts and Deserters eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

Between the outbreak of war with Austria in 1792 and Napoleon's final debacle in 1814, France remained almost continously at war, recruiting in the process some two to three million frenchmen--a level of recruitment unknown to previous generations and widely resented as an attack on the liberties of rural communities. Forrest challenges the notion of a nation heroically rushing to arms by examining the massive rates of desertion and avoidance of service as well as their consequences on French society--on military campaigns and the morale of armies, on political opinion at home, on the social fabric of local villages, and on the Napoleonic dream of bringing about a coherent and centralized state.

#7 Beyond Pilgrim Souvenirs and Secular Badges

Beyond Pilgrim Souvenirs and Secular Badges Book Sarah Blick
  • Author : Sarah Blick
  • Publisher : N.a
  • Release Date : 2007-07-08
  • Total Pages : 208
  • Genre : Social Science
  • Review : (307)

Download #7 Beyond Pilgrim Souvenirs and Secular Badges eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

Brian Spencer, former Keeper of the Museum of London, was a major scholar of medieval popular culture. He almost single-handedly established the study of pilgrim souvenirs and secular badges. He defined what these objects were and ascertained their function, manufacture, style, and iconography with a careful use of primary documents and intricate stylistic analysis. He identified every major souvenir and badge discovered in Great Britain during the last few decades. He also made prominent contributions to the field of seal matrices, gaming pieces, and horse paraphernalia. What bound all of these interests together was his understanding that the study of these artefacts could shed light on the beliefs and practices of a large number of people. This is reflected in the frequency with which his work is cited. This volume is a collection of essays written by those who worked with Brian directly and those with whom he corresponded.

#8 Calvet's Web

Calvet's Web Book L. W. B. Brockliss
  • Author : L. W. B. Brockliss
  • Publisher : OUP Oxford
  • Release Date : 2002-07-04
  • Total Pages : 506
  • Genre : History
  • Review : (148)

Download #8 Calvet's Web eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

Calvet's Web is a study of the correspondence network of an Avignon physician in the period 1750-1810. Esprit Calvet was an antiquarian, natural historian, and bibliophile, and was at the centre of a circle of like-minded intellectuals from various backgrounds, chiefly based in the Rhone valley. Laurence Brockliss explores for the first time in detail the intellectual interests and relationships of a representative sample of the French Republic of Letters. He traces the destruction of the Republic during the Revolution, and its reconstruction, in different guise, under Napoleon. Calvet's Web is an important contribution to our understanding of the social construction of knowledge, the history of collecting, and the history of the book. In addition, by examining the circle's attitude to the philosophes and their programme of material and moral progress, it offers a new picture of the relationship between the Republic of Letters and the Enlightenment.

#9 Butler's Lives of the Saints

Butler's Lives of the Saints Book Alban Butler
  • Author : Alban Butler
  • Publisher : Liturgical Press
  • Release Date : 1995
  • Total Pages : 293
  • Genre : Biography & Autobiography
  • Review : (217)

Download #9 Butler's Lives of the Saints eBook Pdf ePub and Kindle

For more than two centuries, "Butler's" has been one of the best known, most widely consulted hagiographies. In its brief and authoritative entries, readers can find a wealth of knowledge on the lives and deeds of the saints, as well as their ecclesiastical and historical importance since canonization.